Simon Steven's five year plan has its first poster child in what is becoming known as ‘Devo Mancâ€This forward thinking model integrating a complete health economy under a single devolved shared budget is a brave step for the NHS and other partners involved.
A critical success factor will be how well they harness the underlying data behind health and social care activity and transform it into credible actionable information that is shared transparently between stakeholders to drive their collective behaviour and used to measure the outcomes. Unfortunately, we have seen that for most major transformational programmes business intelligence is an afterthought and usually associated with IT becoming buried in the world of systems instead at the forefront of change.

Viewed from the perspective of change management business intelligence can be a pivotal tool to challenge the status quo by providing indisputable evidence about what progress looks like and how it can be achieved by integrating care processes. It can also be used to show us where outcomes do not align with the rhetoric. The continued evolution in business intelligence tools and the ease in which users of any capability can now access and use these makes them a very disruptive force. This means we need to have in place strategies for their adoption and use so they can become a core part of any transformational programme from the outset.

Based on our experience over 25 years benchmarking the commissioning and provision of care across the NHS we know executives need to recognise the importance and power of business intelligence to drive transformational change and collectively plan for this at the start. Modern software should insulate us from the heated struggle of systems integration and help us talk instead about pooling and blending of data from each stakeholder’s information systems to form a joined up “single watch view of time” of patient care, its cost and areas of unwarranted variation in its delivery.

By Jason Harries, Managing Director, Capita Health Insight.This forward thinking model integrating a complete health economy under a single devolved shared budget is a brave step for the NHS and other partners involved.
A critical success factor will be how well they harness the underlying data behind health and social care activity and transform it into credible actionable information that is shared transparently between stakeholders to drive their collective behaviour and used to measure the outcomes. Unfortunately, we have seen that for most major transformational programmes business intelligence is an afterthought and usually associated with IT becoming buried in the world of systems instead at the forefront of change.

Viewed from the perspective of change management business intelligence can be a pivotal tool to challenge the status quo by providing indisputable evidence about what progress looks like and how it can be achieved by integrating care processes. It can also be used to show us where outcomes do not align with the rhetoric. The continued evolution in business intelligence tools and the ease in which users of any capability can now access and use these makes them a very disruptive force. This means we need to have in place strategies for their adoption and use so they can become a core part of any transformational programme from the outset.

Based on our experience over 25 years benchmarking the commissioning and provision of care across the NHS we know executives need to recognise the importance and power of business intelligence to drive transformational change and collectively plan for this at the start. Modern software should insulate us from the heated struggle of systems integration and help us talk instead about pooling and blending of data from each stakeholder’s information systems to form a joined up “single watch view of time” of patient care, its cost and areas of unwarranted variation in its delivery.

By Jason Harries, Managing Director, Capita Health Insight.This forward thinking model integrating a complete health economy under a single devolved shared budget is a brave step for the NHS and other partners involved.
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